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Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA)

Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA)

FCPA in additional languages:

Arabic - عربي

Bengali

Chinese (Cantonese) - 廣東話

Chinese (Mandarin) -官話

French - Français

German - Deutsch

Japanese -日本語

Javanese - Basa Jawa

Korean -한국어

Malay - Bahasa Malaysia

Portuguese - Português

Russian - Русский

Spanish - Español

Urdu - اردو

 

Examples of Successful Prosecutions of the FCPA

1.  S.E.C. v. Alcatel-Lucent, S.A. (1:10-CV-24620)

2.  S.E.C. v. Chevron Corporation (07-CV-10299)

3.  S.E.C. v. ENI, S.p.A. and Snamprogetti Netherlands, B.V. (4:10-cv-02414)

4.   S.E.C. v. Syncor International Corporation (1:02CV02421)

5.  S.E.C. v. Siemens Aktiengesellschaft (1 :08-cv-02167)

6.  S.E.C. v. Statoil, ASA (File No. 3-12453)

7.  S.E.C. v. Technip (4:10-cv-02289)

8.  United States v. DPC (Tianjin) Co. Ltd. (05-CR-482)

9.  United States v. Enrique Aguilar, et al.  (10-CR-1031)

10.  United States v. Juthamas Siriwan, et al
(09-CR-081) 

11.  United States v. Kellogg Brown & Root LLC
(09-CR-071)

12.  United States v. Misao Hioki (08-CR-795)

13.   United States v. Novo Nordisk A/S (09-CR-126-RJL)

14.   United States v. SSI International Far East, Ltd.
(06-CR-398)

15.   United States v. Vetco Gray Controls Inc., et al. (07-CR-004)

  

1.  S.E.C. v. Alcatel-Lucent, S.A. (1:10-CV-24620)

Alcatel-Lucent, S.A. is a U.S. subsidiary of Alcatel, a French-based corporation.  Alcatel-Lucent, S.A.'s American Depository Receipts were traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Alcatel-Lucent, S.A. paid bribes to foreign government officials to obtain and retain business contracts in Latin America and Asia.  Alcatel-Lucent paid $45.372 million in disgorgement to the SEC and $92 million in criminal penalties to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  (Top)

            Indictment                                                 Press Release

2.  S.E.C. v. Chevron Corporation (07-CV-10299)

Chevron Corporation, a California-based oil company, made contracts with third parties that paid illegal payments in connection with Chevron's purchase of crude oil under the U.N. Oil for Food Program.  Chevron knew or should have known that the third parties paid a portion of their premiums they received from Chevron to Iraq government officials.  Chevron paid a total of $30 million for their connection in the scheme.  (Top)

           Indictment                                                 Press Release

3.  S.E.C. v. ENI, S.p.A. and Snamprogetti Netherlands, B.V. (4:10-cv-02414)

Italian companies ENI, S.p.A., and S.p.A.'s former Dutch subsidiary Snamprogetti Netherlands, B.V. were charged for their participation in a four-company joint venture that bribed Nigerian government officials to obtain construction contracts. ENI and Snamprogetti paid jointly $125 million in disgorgement to the SEC and Snamprogetti also paid a criminal penalty of $240 million to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  For their connection in the bribery scheme, the four companies of the joint venture paid combined sanctions of $1.28 billion.  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

4.  S.E.C. v. Syncor International Corporation (1:02CV02421) 

Syncor is a company with headquarters in California.  Syncor's common stock was listed on the NASDAQ National Market. Syncor's had been doing business through its foreign subsidiaries in Taiwan, Mexico, Belgium, Luxembourg, and France.  Through its foreign subsidiaries Syncor International Corporation distributed bribes to government hospital personnel.  Syncor paid $500,000 in penalties to the SEC and $2 million in criminal penalties to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

5.  S.E.C. v. Siemens Aktiengesellschaft (1 :08-cv-02167) 

Siemens, a German based manufacturer listed on the New York Stock Exchange, engaged in the systemic practice of paying bribes to foreign government officials to obtain business.  Siemens settled to pay $350 million in disgorgement to the SEC and $450 million in criminal penalties to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

6.  S.E.C. v. Statoil, ASA (File No. 3-12453) 

Statoil, a Norway-based company listed on the New York Stock Exchange, paid bribes to Iranian government officials in return for assistance in obtaining a contract to develop a significant oil and gas field in Iran and to open doors to additional projects in the Iranian oil and gas industry.  Statoil paid a disgorgement of $10.5 million to the SEC and a criminal penalty of $10.5 million to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

7.  S.E.C. v. Technip (4:10-cv-02289)

Technip was a France based global company and part of a four-company joint venture that bribed Nigerian government officials to win construction contracts in Nigeria worth more than $6 billion.  Technip paid $98 million to settle with the SEC and $240 million in criminal penalties to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  For their connection in the bribery scheme, the four companies of the joint venture paid combined sanctions of $1.28 billion.  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

8.  United States v. DPC (Tianjin) Co. Ltd. (05-CR-482)

DPC (Diagnostic Products Corporation) was a U.S. corporation with its principal place of business in California.  DPC Tianjin was a wholly-owned subsidiary of DPC based in Tianjin, China.  DPC Tianjin issued bribes to government hospital personnel in China.  Approval for proposed budgets containing the bribes were sent by telephone, facsimile, and electronic mail from California to Tianjin.  DPC Tianjin paid a criminal penalty of $2 million to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

9.  United States v. Enrique Aguilar, et al.  (10-CR-1031)

Enrique Aguilar and Angela Aguilar were directors of Grupo Internacional de Asesores S.A..  Lindsey Manufacturing Company (LM), headquartered in California, hired Grupo to serve as its sales representative in Mexico and to obtain contracts for it from Comision Federa de Electricidad (CFE), a state-owned utility company in Mexico.  Enrique and Angela Aguilar conspired to pay bribes to Mexican government officials at the CFE and take a commission of every service LM performed for CFE.  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

10.  United States v. Juthamas Siriwan, et al
(09-CR-081)

Siriwan, a Thai national, is the former governor of the Tourism Authority in Thailand.  She was charged for willingly accepting bribes from Hollywood producer's, Gerald and Patricia Green, in exchange for tourism contracts with Thailand.  (Top)

            Indictment

11.  United States v. Kellogg Brown & Root LLC
(09-CR-071)

Kellog Brown & Root LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary of KBR, Inc., a publicly traded company with headquarters in Texas.  KBR LLC was charged for their participation in a four-company joint venture that bribed Nigerian government officials to obtain construction contracts.  KBR LLC Paid $402 million in criminal fines to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  For their connection in the bribery scheme, the four companies of the joint venture paid combined sanctions of $1.28 billion.  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

12.  United States v. Misao Hioki (08-CR-795)

Misao Hioki was the General Manager of the International Engineered Products Department, a firm located in Tokyo, Japan.  Hioki was charged for his role in a conspiracy to rig bids, fix prices and allocate market shares of marine hose in the U.S. and elsewhere.  Hioki also made corrupt payments to government officials in Latin America and elsewhere to obtain and retain business.  While attending a cartel meeting in Houston, Hioki and other foreign executives were arrested.  Hioki was sentenced to two years in jail and paid an $80,000 criminal fine to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

13.  United States v. Novo Nordisk A/S (09-CR-126-RJL)

Novo Nordisk was headquartered in Bagsvaerd, Denmark and publically traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Novo conspired to commit wire fraud and pay money to the former Iraqi government.  Their scheme involved inflating the price of contracts before submitting the contracts to the United Nations (U.N.) for approval and concealing the fact that the price included a kickback to the Iraqi government.   This was one of the many cases connected with the schemes to defraud the U.N. Oil-for-Food Program.  Novo paid $9 million in criminal fines to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

14.  United States v. SSI International Far East, Ltd.
(06-CR-398)

 

Schnitzer Steel Industries, Inc. is a publicly traded corporation with headquarters in Oregon.  SSI International is a wholly-owned subsidiary of SSI, Inc. in charge of managing their subsidiaries in Korea and Washington.  SSI, SSI International, and SSI Korea conspired to bribe officers and employees of its government-owned buyers in China.  SSI Korea paid a $7.5 million criminal fine to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  The former senior officer of SSI International, Si Chan Wooh, paid $41,000 to the SEC in civil penalties.  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release

15.  United States v. Vetco Gray Controls Inc., et al. (07-CR-004)

 

All defendants (Vetco Gray Controls Inc., Vetco Gray Controls Ltd., and Veto Gray UK Ltd.) were wholly-owned subsidiaries of Vetco International Ltd. and engaged in a scheme to make corrupt payments to Nigerian government officials to induce Nigerian Customs Service officials to provide the defendants with preferential treatment during the customs process.  These were mostly coordinated through Vetco Gray Controls Inc.'s Houston offices.  The defendants collectively paid a total of $26 million in criminal fines to the Department of Justice (DOJ).  (Top)

            Indictment                                                  Press Release